Viewing entries tagged
Landscape

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Tom Tartaglino "Rivers and Mountains: the Beauty of the Shenandoah Valley"

Occasionally, there is an artist that becomes such a part of the Cabell Gallery, that we wouldn't seem complete without his work. That's how we feel about Tom Tartaglino. He is an artist that we have represented for many years, but now through this highly anticipated solo show, we will get to see an entire collection of work that he put together just for us...and more importantly, for you.

Buena Vista from Above - 18”x61”

Buena Vista from Above - 18”x61”

In September of 2018 we will feature the works of artist Tom Tartaglino with his show "Rivers and Mountains : the Beauty of the Shenandoah Valley." His realism can be astounding, but what I like the most about his paintings is that I could look at it for years and every time see something I hadn't seen before. Come meet him and discuss his new collection. It's so fascinating to hear how much thought goes into each work (down to the handmade frames!) yet he makes it look so effortless.

Tom Tartaglino at work

Tom Tartaglino at work

“Headwater” etching - plate size 12”x12”

“Headwater” etching - plate size 12”x12”

Tom was born 1956 in Heidelburg, Germany, but he grew up in suburban Maryland, married, and moved to Palmyra, Virginia in 1979. There he bought a house in the country to raise vegetables and children before attending Virginia Commonwealth University, receiving a BFA in 1994. He has worked as an artist since.

"Although I am an art school graduate, my training and experience come from a lifetime love of painting. Art school gave me helpful hints. My inspiration for a work of art usually happens while observing a scene many times. The scene will draw me in and I start to see what it is I am attracted to. I will try to capture a psychological truth about my subject, which I see in plein aire impressionism, but I will be looking for subtleties that an impressionistic handling would miss. Through close observation, I concentrate on the details that make it realistic and truthful. When complete, it will be about something beyond the scene. It will have a depiction of a physical person or place, but carry a mood we all identify with."

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New Artist: Wendy Musser!

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New Artist: Wendy Musser!

We are so pleased to welcome North Carolina native, Wendy Musser to the Cabell Gallery! 

Oil and pastel landscape painting is her primary focus.  Her education includes obtaining an Associate of Arts Degree from Peace College, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.  Returning to school later, she completed a second major in Interior Design at Meredith College.

After years of working in art related fields Wendy aspired to return to her college art training.  She then began to study acrylic studio painting under Mary Anne K. Jenkins.

 To better understand the landscape and to capture the inspiration of being in nature as one paints, in 2001 she began studying “plein air” pastel painting.  Due to the array of pastel colors available the medium has energy and immediacy that makes painting on location an exciting experience.  Translating the stimulation of painting in nature into a vivid yet harmonious image of colors is a rewarding challenge.  The plein air paintings are generally worked to near completion while on the painting site.  Back in the studio the pieces are evaluated and finishing touches are added.  Once finished, they may become an inspiration for larger scale paintings.

Believing that learning should be a life long experience Wendy has continued to study pastel painting with Kevin Beck, Albert Handell, and Richard McKinley.   Her studies in oil has been under Scott Christensen, Rick Mc Clure, John Poon and Libby Tolley.  She is a Signature Member of the Pastel Society of America, a Charter member of PAiNT NC and the Pastel Society of North Carolina.  She is the Co-fonder and Secretary of the Western Wake Artist Studio Tour and has been accepted in and received awards in juried shows in the Triangle Area since 1997.  

"Plein air painting is not only observing the object as you paint it, but painting in the out of doors.  My first experience with the medium of dry pastels and my first experience of painting in nature were at a workshop.

I was immediately hooked.  I am convinced that painting out in nature is both the most challenging and most rewarding painting experience.  Not all of my selected painting locations are breathtaking.  All, however, are unique and the test is to create an inspiring image from any location.  Concentrating on a single focus of interest among a vast array of subject matter is very challenging.  Light changes so quickly that the image you see is constantly changing.  As I paint, the light is quickly moving, the birds are singing, the bugs are biting, the air is refreshing (or muggy, or freezing) and the subject is directly in front of me for translation into a painting.  Dealing with the distractions of the elements and working hard to capture a moment when the light is favorable makes the painting process even more exciting and exhausting.

My goal is to capture the beauty of the places that I have discovered and to lure viewers to want to visit the very spot where I have painted.  God has given us a beautiful world that is quickly being altered by our actions.  I hope that my painting experiences can preserve a glimpse of the natural beauty of this great land and to entice others to take time to celebrate the environment we have been given by enjoying the gift of our landscape"

(Pictured above: "Greener Pastures" 20x20 Pastel)

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Congratulations Camp Mont Shenandoah 90 years and still going strong

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Congratulations Camp Mont Shenandoah 90 years and still going strong

Painting by Curney Nuffer available at Cabell Gallery

This summer, Camp Mont Shenandoah celebrates its 90th year.  Recently listed on the National Register of Historic Places and the Virginia Landmarks Register, it is the oldest private residential camp in continuous operation in the state.  “Significantly, this turn-of-the-century camp is among the few places that created outdoor experiences solely for young women, and to this day the place has retained its architectural heritage and its picturesque setting,” said Julie Langan, Director of Virginia’s Department of Historic Resources Director.

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Presenting Linda Hollett-Bazouzi  August guest artist. Opening Aug. 7, 5:00-7:30

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Presenting Linda Hollett-Bazouzi August guest artist. Opening Aug. 7, 5:00-7:30

Linda Hollett-Bazouzi

Look, look, look...
It used to be the first written words we learned: "Look, Dick, look." See, Jane, see."

Do you ever look behind you...above you, below you, to your left or right? How many breath-taking sunsets have you missed because you were driving east in the evening, or you were too busy thinking about work to see the moon setting in the morning? Have you ever wished you had your camera with you to capture that moment, or—and this is the big one—never appreciated a view until a building went up in front of it, or a bulldozer plowed it under? I try to capture those moments, those views, before they disappear. Even more, I try to capture the feeling associated with those views. My work is not about just documentation; it is about passage.

Alla prima, au premier coup—all at once, first strike. My best work has always been about this. Whether outside or in the studio, once I’ve completed my thought process, I work until the painting is done. Because of how I paint, it is very difficult to go back and finish later. My preliminary plans include not just composition, but where I will stop and start. I use a painting knife almost exclusively, and that lays the paint onto the surface very differently than a brush. Once the paint has begun to harden, I can’t push and pull the paint around, scratch and scrub, build and obliterate. The texture becomes too busy, too disruptive to my thought process. The immediacy of application mirrors the urgency I often feel.

In the studio I may work12 hours uninterrupted on a large canvas—capturing that same sense of urgency I feel when working in the field. My work en plein air is fueled not only by constantly changing light and weather, but also by the locations I choose. I am drawn to areas that we see but don’t notice, that seem unimportant—until development or destruction comes. This results in my work being done in a series, expressing change over time, real or imagined, within myself or in the location.

Tick tock, tick tock...

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