Viewing entries tagged
Downtown Lexington

Vraisemblance of Lexington

Comment

Vraisemblance of Lexington

It’s hard to believe Ed Hatch isn’t from Lexington. Many of his paintings here at the Cabell Gallery of Virginia Art offer a true slice of life for any Lexingtonian. One instantly recognizes the Washington Street gallery row, the interior of the Southern Inn, and the Maury River. In fact, Ed is from Spring Grove, Virginia, nearly three hours away. His studio is located in the exact location his grandparents once owned a general store. A professional, accomplished, and honored artist of over twenty years, Ed Hatch captures the beauty, warmth, and community spirit that only a native, rural Virginian can encompass. 

IMG_8255.jpg
IMG_8244.jpg


Ed’s luminous and realistic paintings give the feeling of being able to jump into them and participate in the action. Place. Time. See your reserved table at the Southern Inn for the evening, float down the Maury River in your kayak or inner tube in the afternoon, and walk down Washington Street’s gallery row in the morning. When you do, don’t forget to stop in and see us, Cabell Gallery of Virginia Art, and see all the great things we have to offer Lexington, our many visitors, and friends.

IMG_8245.jpg
IMG_8242.jpg

Comment

Fine Art...With A Side Of History at September's Very Special First Friday

Comment

Fine Art...With A Side Of History at September's Very Special First Friday

We know you already have First Friday’s Gallery Walk on your calendar for every month because we always have a wonderful turnout, but in September we have an extra-special reason to make 5 W. Washington your first stop!

At 5 p.m., Cabell Gorman, owner of the Cabell Gallery of Fine Art, and Harry H. Warner, owner of the building at 5 W. Washington St. in downtown Lexington, will be celebrating the dedication of a plaque commemorating the unique history of our 1914 building, which has been designated officially by the Historic Lexington Foundation as the “Withrow Gift Shop”. 

Although the current building is just over a century old, it stands on one of the original half-acre lots on the six original streets laid out after Lexington was created as a county seat in 1777.  In 1792, William Alexander purchased all the lots on the present west side of Washington Street between Main and Jefferson Streets.  He built one of the oldest – and finest - standing structures in town, known now as the Alexander-Withrow House (location of The Georges today). 

Owned by a succession of other prominent citizens and their families, including John Leyburn and George Baker, Jack Withrow purchased the property in 1886 and constructed the “Gift Shop” in 1914. Withrow and his descendants owned the property for over 80 years. 

In 1969, 5 W. Washington and the Withrow Gift Shop was sold as a separate parcel, despite the earnest endeavors of the recently created Historic Lexington Foundation, which hoped to keep the property intact.  Although outbid at auction on the Withrow Gift Shop, the Historic Lexington Foundation was able to acquire and preserve the Alexander-Withrow House. 

Even with all the interior changes in recent decades, the Withrow Gift Shop has had the good fortune to maintain what has been described as, “the typical Victorian Shop Front configuration.  This entails two large windows flanking a central recessed door.  “Up above, the cornice is quite simple with small brackets and carved blocks.”

Between 1969 and 2013, when it was purchased by Harry H. Warner, the Withrow Gift Shop housed several businesses including Lexington Lighting and the law office of renowned attorney Larry Mann (husband of Lexington's most famous photographer, Sally Mann.) And, of course, Cabell Gallery of Fine Art will soon be celebrating three successful years at 5 W. Washington with many more yet to come. Future historians take note!

Comment

A Love Letter to Lexington in the Snow

3 Comments

A Love Letter to Lexington in the Snow

<photo credit: Gail MacLeod>

Lexington in the snow…you are one of the most beautiful sites I have ever seen.  I love the way the snow clings to your brickwork on your old buildings and caps your iron railings like frosting.  You have always been charming, but in the snow you are somehow magical. 
I’m not naive, I know not everyone appreciates you like I do. I know some people say, “Oh the snow looks nice, but I don’t want to go OUT in it. It’s too much hassle.” Really?? They must not remember what it was like to be a kid and play in the show for hours.  So I get some snow on my boots, no big deal.  It’s worth this to be with you when you are so beautiful.
I know there are some who say, “I can’t go DOWNTOWN in the snow, there is no place to park.” These people don’t know that it’s the perfect time to discover downtown Lexington.  So you might not be able to park right in front of where you are going; Lexington is meant to be walked. I have wandered through your downtown, Lexington, and I always find something unexpected. I moved here in 1983 and often I see things that I didn’t know about (or forgot about?) when I walk your streets.
I hope others love you like I do, Lexington. I hope that they appreciate your restaurants, and shops, and quirks. I hope they love walking down West Washington and seeing all the art at the Cabell Gallery and Artists in Cahoots, and the Nelson Gallery. There are so many places a person can find in Downtown Lexington where people show off their talents. For such a small town, I could spend a whole weekend just walking your streets…and yes, even in the snow! People can pop in to the Lexington Coffee Shop for a coffee or hot chocolate, or maybe into Sweet Treats for one of their juicy hamburgers or warm sandwiches. And if they are from out of town they can stay right downtown at the Georges or the R. E. Lee.
Lexington, I’ve never known anyone who visits you that doesn’t fall in love. I hope that more people appreciate all that you have to offer…especially in the snow.

 

3 Comments