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Fine Art

Vraisemblance of Lexington

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Vraisemblance of Lexington

It’s hard to believe Ed Hatch isn’t from Lexington. Many of his paintings here at the Cabell Gallery of Virginia Art offer a true slice of life for any Lexingtonian. One instantly recognizes the Washington Street gallery row, the interior of the Southern Inn, and the Maury River. In fact, Ed is from Spring Grove, Virginia, nearly three hours away. His studio is located in the exact location his grandparents once owned a general store. A professional, accomplished, and honored artist of over twenty years, Ed Hatch captures the beauty, warmth, and community spirit that only a native, rural Virginian can encompass. 

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Ed’s luminous and realistic paintings give the feeling of being able to jump into them and participate in the action. Place. Time. See your reserved table at the Southern Inn for the evening, float down the Maury River in your kayak or inner tube in the afternoon, and walk down Washington Street’s gallery row in the morning. When you do, don’t forget to stop in and see us, Cabell Gallery of Virginia Art, and see all the great things we have to offer Lexington, our many visitors, and friends.

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10 Tips for Buying Art

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10 Tips for Buying Art

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People come into the gallery every day and say “I don’t know anything about art.” First of all, it doesn’t matter, but second, yes you do. Unless you are spending hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars on collecting art, all you need to know is does it speak to you. If it moves you, then it is good. If it does not make you feel, then it is not for you and move on. Don’t settle for art that you have no connection with. You will be looking at this every day so it better feel like the real thing. Just like my mom used to say, “When you know, you’ll know.”

If you still feel that you want more tips in buying art, here it is quite simply…

Top 10 Tips for Buying art

#1    Choose art from the heart

Choosing art doesn’t need to be rocket science nor do you need a degree in art history. If a work of art makes you smile, or moves you in some way then you have been inspired, making a spontaneous emotional connection. If you find an artwork that you can’t stop thinking about, chances are it is meant to be in your life. Sometimes you find art and sometimes art finds you. All you need is a love and appreciation of fine art and a desire to collect it. If you don’t feel it, don’t buy it. It’s that simple.

#2    Be confident

Buy art for yourself and because you love it, not because you think others will. Visitors come and go however you’ll live with that artwork every day. Have the confidence to express yourself with the art you choose. Don’t be scared to buy big and make a statement. Art is a great reflection of your own personality. Chances are if you are into it then people you love will be too.

#3    The right place for your art

You absolutely don’t have to buy art to fit a spot or a particular wall. If you move or redecorate then the painting you matched to the couch or choose for the position may not work anymore anyway. Speaking from experience, if you love it, there will always fond a perfect spot for it. Think about moving your art around your home. Swap your art around from wall to wall, room to room. That’s what we do all the time at the gallery. It’s a great way to reinvigorate your home and you’ll find art can look quite different once moved. Just experiment and you’ll soon be appreciating your collection all over again!

#4    Make artwork the star

At the Cabell Gallery the artists each frame their work themselves. But if you don’t like the frame just say so! Never let that be the reason you pass by a good piece. If your artwork needs framing, be sure to create an overall harmony with the piece itself. The frame should neither dominate nor under whelm. Well-considered, quality framing will add value to your overall investment. We are happy to help with suggestions.

#5    It’s OK to be eclectic

Creating a diverse art collection is inspiring and unpredictable. Why not pair an original vintage poster with an oil still life? Mix it up and make your own rules. You don’t just have one mood, neither should your collection. A home with one style of artwork can be predictable. Diversification is also great if you are considering art as a long term investment.

#6    Use good lighting

Position lamps, rotate down lights and track lights to highlight artwork and create an inviting atmosphere in your home. You will be amazed what a difference a simple repositioning of light makes. If renovating or building, talk to the architect and electrician about your art (or future art collection) and how to use lighting to display it to its greatest potential.

#7    Create your own artworks

Essentially art is human expression finding form, so give form to your actual life! Pin up your children’s drawings. Blow up an old photo and print it on canvas or wallpaper. Frame a series of postcards you find on your travels or give your toddler’s ceramic creation pride of place for all to enjoy. This mixed with your collected art tells the story of YOU. It’s about being real and feeling connected. Be creative - it doesn’t need to last a lifetime; but you can enjoy it for now.

#8    Give the gift of art

Giving art can be a perfect symbol of friendship, love or gratitude that will last a lifetime. Or be on the receiving end by asking family and friends to contribute towards an artwork you have selected to celebrate a special occasion. Don’t forget that we have gift certificates!

#9    Meet the artist

Meet the artist and hear their story, let that experience enrich your own connection. We have a different artist in every First Friday. Share the artists story with others, inspiring them to fall in love with art too. If its not possible to meet the artist, we would be happy to put you in touch with them as we believe understanding why it was created adds depth and furthers your knowledge and connection. Put simply, choose art from the heart. Fall in love with it, enjoy and cherish it. Talk about it with your friends. Tell them why you chose it and how it makes you feel. Art is a great way to start a conversation and connect to other people.

#10    Start your collecting today

There’s no better time to start collecting original art than now. It takes just one piece then you are on your way. Always keep it original and authentic. Buy a smaller original work if your budget is tight. Ask us about a payment plan if your heart is set on piece. And if you are concerned about whether it will look right in you home, let’s talk. We can often arrange for you to loan it out so you can take it home and see. And, of course, you always have 15 days to return it for any reason or no reason at all! But whatever you do, don’t be afraid to buy art. Imagine the collection you could have in 10 years from now if you start today!

 

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The Art You Treasure Most

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The Art You Treasure Most

So we just went through the crazy busy time of year here in Lexington. Where the parents and families of all the graduating students from VMI, SVU, and W&L descend on Lexington. Don't get me wrong, we love it! Any opportunity to show off our town to other people we'll take it. 

I NEVER get tired of hearing out-of-towners say, "Lexington! What a wonderful town. I had no idea! You have such a great art vibe here."

Yes :)  We do.

When all the families come for graduation, they come in looking for art that will remind their graduate of their school or maybe just Virginia. Having grown up in Lexington, I can certainly speak for VMI and W&L that their graduates love this town so dearly that many of them grow up to get second homes here, or retire here. Or, like me, just move back to the best place they could find on the planet. 

When picking out a graduation gift, many of the families get what I get. Nothing is a better gift than art. See, some people think you shouldn't buy art for other people. Not true. Especially when it is someone young. When they are graduating and going to live in their own place, perhaps their first apartment, few young adults can prioritize art. It's just not what they are spending their money on yet. But somehow, when they are given art, hanging an original work in their home makes them feel like an adult. There is a right of passage almost to "Now I have more than framed posters of Monet or Bob Marley. Now I have original art." And when that art reflects on a very important time in their life, say, college, that makes you treasure it even more. And you have created an heirloom, perhaps their first. One that their kids and maybe their kids will always know too. The gift giver always like to think that they will be remembered when they give a gift. Well, something as meaningful and permanent as art certainly does that.

At the Cabell Gallery we really focus, not just on Fine Art, but on Fine Art from the central Virginia area. Sometimes even scenes of the schools themselves. I tell you, it's a real kick for me to see a young person get their first real piece. The first of many hopefully. So think about it; if you have a young adult in your life, whether they have graduated or not, maybe it's birthday, Christmas, new baby, or no reason at all, the gift of art is something that you treasure your whole life. And, if it is a work that represents an important time in their life, even more so. Stop by or check out our website. And if you have something specific in mind, tell us about it! Many of our artists would gladly paint you the vision that you have in your head. Talk about a personal gift! People who say that you "can't" give art as a gift don't know what they are missing. Art, it may be the gift they will always treasure the most.

 

 

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Congratulations Camp Mont Shenandoah 90 years and still going strong

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Congratulations Camp Mont Shenandoah 90 years and still going strong

Painting by Curney Nuffer available at Cabell Gallery

This summer, Camp Mont Shenandoah celebrates its 90th year.  Recently listed on the National Register of Historic Places and the Virginia Landmarks Register, it is the oldest private residential camp in continuous operation in the state.  “Significantly, this turn-of-the-century camp is among the few places that created outdoor experiences solely for young women, and to this day the place has retained its architectural heritage and its picturesque setting,” said Julie Langan, Director of Virginia’s Department of Historic Resources Director.

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It's the End of the World As We Know It, But I Feel Fine...

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It's the End of the World As We Know It, But I Feel Fine...

<Painting : Foggy Day in Virginia by Julia Lesnichy (available at Cabell Gallery)>

The world is going to hell in a hand basket! At least it seems like it if you listen to TV, or Radio, or Social Media. Our bridges are crumbling, our glaciers are melting, no one can get a job, college cost more, aging people have less.  If _________ becomes president I’m moving to Canada! It is all pretty stressful. I guess I could just take a Xanax and keep doing what I’m doing, but I have a better idea. Art.

You know, at one time I thought of art as just something to collect, maybe it reminded me of a certain trip, maybe it was cool and I wanted others to see it, or maybe it even matched my couch. Those are all completely acceptable reasons to have art, by the way. But then I discovered not just collecting art, but spending TIME with art. 

Sometimes here at the Cabell Gallery, we will get a student that wanders in from the W&L Law School and says, “I’m not here to buy anything, is it alright if I just look at the art? I just had an exam and I need to decompress.” I love that. What a great purpose that art gets to serve, not just to bring joy…but to bring peace. 

I like to spend time with art. I like trees. I like rivers. I like fields. There are some wonderful paintings of fields here at Cabell Gallery that I can just get lost in, that I can look at and imagine what the wind sounds like as I’m walking through them. Sometimes people say, “Oh I don’t have any more room in my house for art,” (there is no such thing btw) but I will say, “What about your office?” The office is where you could REALLY use a tree, or a river, or a field to get lost in for a few minutes. Try it. When I find myself immersed in a painting of the Blue Ridge Mountains, I may not know all the answers to the world's problems, but I know this; there is no way I’m moving to Canada.

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Nationally known Artist, Christopher Wynn Presented By Cabell Gallery

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Nationally known Artist, Christopher Wynn Presented By Cabell Gallery

Join Cabell Gallery November 6 for the show opening

Christopher majored in fine art at the University of Washington, Seattle, and the University of California Berkeley, where he graduated with a B.S.. Further art studies include Otis Parsons art institute and Santa Monica JC, and Foothill JC in Los Altos, CA.

After graduating, he worked for years as an art director and creative director for numerous corporations and advertising agencies on the West Coast. In 1992 he began wynncreative.com and produced artwork and campaigns for many of Silicon Valley's largest and most successful companies.

In 2005 and 2006, Christopher circumvented the globe solo for seven months to paint watercolors plein aire in over 24 countries.

Currently, his watercolors are represented by a number of art galleries and art venues on the East and West Coast, and in and around Richmond, Virginia in particular

Christopher has won well over 65 National and International Awards for both his design and fine art. 

The artist is a member of numerous professional organizations, including:

A Signature member of the Southern Watercolor Society, Baltimore Watercolor Society, the Virginia Watercolor Society, the Philadelphia Watercolor Society, the Alabama Watercolor, Missouri Watercolor Society, The American Artists Professional League, NYC and in 2015, the Georgia Watercolor Society.

Further memberships in:

National Watercolor Society
American Watercolor Society
Transparent Watercolor Society of America
Watercolor West
Bon Air Artists Association

 

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What is Raku? September Features David Camden's Work

Raku is a low-temperature firing process where the clay artwork is removed from the kiln while glowing hot, and then placed in a container filled with wood-chips, leaves, or paper. This causes athermal shock that produces a craze pattern as well as a smoked, accidental quality to the glaze.

Raku developed with the increased popularity of the Japanese tea ceremony. The drinking of tea, which was closely associated with Zen Buddhism, developed into a formalized ritual where the Raku vessels symbolized the beauty, the simplicity and unassuming qualities that were felt to be in harmony with every day life.

David Camden's artworks, which we will feature in September, are beautiful examples of this technique. There are many levels you canenjoy his artworks of glowing color and organic shapes. They are sculptural with textures that range from shiny and smooth, architectural repetitions, and areas that include the marks his process leaves behind. Every part of your home, office, or museum will benefit from these peaceful examples of harmony.

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Presenting Linda Hollett-Bazouzi  August guest artist. Opening Aug. 7, 5:00-7:30

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Presenting Linda Hollett-Bazouzi August guest artist. Opening Aug. 7, 5:00-7:30

Linda Hollett-Bazouzi

Look, look, look...
It used to be the first written words we learned: "Look, Dick, look." See, Jane, see."

Do you ever look behind you...above you, below you, to your left or right? How many breath-taking sunsets have you missed because you were driving east in the evening, or you were too busy thinking about work to see the moon setting in the morning? Have you ever wished you had your camera with you to capture that moment, or—and this is the big one—never appreciated a view until a building went up in front of it, or a bulldozer plowed it under? I try to capture those moments, those views, before they disappear. Even more, I try to capture the feeling associated with those views. My work is not about just documentation; it is about passage.

Alla prima, au premier coup—all at once, first strike. My best work has always been about this. Whether outside or in the studio, once I’ve completed my thought process, I work until the painting is done. Because of how I paint, it is very difficult to go back and finish later. My preliminary plans include not just composition, but where I will stop and start. I use a painting knife almost exclusively, and that lays the paint onto the surface very differently than a brush. Once the paint has begun to harden, I can’t push and pull the paint around, scratch and scrub, build and obliterate. The texture becomes too busy, too disruptive to my thought process. The immediacy of application mirrors the urgency I often feel.

In the studio I may work12 hours uninterrupted on a large canvas—capturing that same sense of urgency I feel when working in the field. My work en plein air is fueled not only by constantly changing light and weather, but also by the locations I choose. I am drawn to areas that we see but don’t notice, that seem unimportant—until development or destruction comes. This results in my work being done in a series, expressing change over time, real or imagined, within myself or in the location.

Tick tock, tick tock...

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Before The Cabell Gallery : The Storied Past of 5 West Washington St.

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Before The Cabell Gallery : The Storied Past of 5 West Washington St.

Picture above: Family of Dabney C. Carver IV

We recently had the pleasure of meeting descendants of 5 West Washington Street's previous occupants...

Before the gallery was established, the building was used as a hair salon, and before that a law office for Larry Mann (blacksmith and husband of photographer Sally Mann), who's hand wrought sign hanger now holds our sign out front.  

This was as far back as spoken history had taken us until this past Saturday, when we had the privilege of meeting the family of Dabney C. Carver IV, who owned and operated Lexington Lighting and Electric Company here at 5 West Washington Street from 1976 until the late 1980's.  

Mr. Carver's daughter Carole Carver Avery, her husband Guy, and their two daughters Ellie and Molly stopped by the gallery last Saturday for a trip down memory lane.  Mrs. Avery noted the many changes to the space and reminisced about her summers spent behind the sales counter.  She also mentioned that the desk lamps sold in the store were a hot ticket item for local students at both VMI and Washington and Lee.  

We loved unlocking another chapter in the history of our great location at 5 West Washington St and would love to learn more!

Do you recall a memorable moment at 5 West Washington, if so, share it with us! Leave comments below or visit our Facebook page!

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"Nimrod Hall: A place for artists to create without the distraction of everyday life."

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"Nimrod Hall: A place for artists to create without the distraction of everyday life."

Cabell Gallery cproudly presents...
The Nimrod Hall Instructors

We are pleased to welcome these 13 instructors from Nimrod Hall as our featured artists for June:

     
                     Mary Holland            
Sara Linda Poly

        Purnell Pettyjohn      
Susannah Raine Haddad

     Rosalie Day White    
Curney Nuffer

              Anne Walker             
Jessie Coles

             Andras Bality            
Diego Sanchez

            Jane Joyner              
 Laura Loe                   

Fielding Archer
Join us on June 5th from 5:00pm to 7:30pm
 for a welcome reception.

 

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The Nimrod Hall Instructors Show At Cabell Gallery June 2015

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The Nimrod Hall Instructors Show At Cabell Gallery June 2015

Nimrod Hall Summer Resort and Art Colony

Nimrod Hall. Established in 1783, has been providing summer respite from everyday stress for well over a century. We continue to offer a step back in time, for artists to create, for guests to enjoy and for anyone who stays at Nimrod Hall to experience it’s magic. 

September, 2013, Will Loving and Laura Loe purchased Nimrod Hall from previous caretakers,  Jim and Frankie Wood Apistolas. This is the first time Nimrod Hall has changed ownership since Frankie’s Grandfather, Lewis Wood, purchased the property in 1906 in order to run a summer resort. Please read the information about our beloved place and we hope you will join us some upcoming summer. Our mission is to keep this unique Virginia landmark around for all the people who hold it dear to their hearts. Nimrod Hall is a seasonal summer resort that is open from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

Nimrod Hall is owned and operated by Will Loving and Laura Loe Loving

 216 Nimrod Drive, Millboro, VA 24460

http://www.nimrodhall.com/Nimrod_Hall/Established,_1783.html

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