The return of the First Fridays art walk was a success as we celebrated the work of Roanoke artist Susan Egbert. Her work will be featured in the gallery throughout the month of March so be sure to stop in! To fully appreciate Susan's unique work, it's important to understand the process of creating monotypes, which constitute the majority of her collection in the gallery. 

First, a definition: Mono-typing is a form of printmaking that has lines or images that can only be made once, unlike most printmaking, where there are multiple originals. There are many techniques for creating monotypes. Examples of printmaking techniques which can be used to make monotypes include lithography, woodcut, and etching.

And now the process with photos below borrowed from the blog "'Diary of a Madd Weekly Painter': Small Paintings by Sue Furrow" and the post titled "Monoprint Demo by Susan Egbert" (Aug 8,2012). 

First, Susan uses brayers to mix water soluble oils on a piece of plexiglass. Next she rolls the oils onto another piece of plexiglass that is customized to the size the final image should be. Susan then continues to add more colors and layers. To create the image she uses brayers, brushes and nibs to remove paint and create textures. 

Once the artist is satisfied with the image she places the painted plexiglass on the press table with a damp sheet of watercolor paper on top. Next, she cranks the plate and paper through the press and TA-DAH!! A Susan Egbert monotype!

Pictured above is "October Meadow," an 18x18 framed oil monotype, which is still available at the gallery! 

Pictured above is "October Meadow," an 18x18 framed oil monotype, which is still available at the gallery! 

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